Behind the Photos in the November/December 2016 Issue

by Beth A Richardson on November 8, 2016

Order a copy of the November/December 2016 issue, “Homelessness” by calling 1.800.972.0433. Download the digital edition.

homeplace

“The 1850 Homeplace is a favorite place for me. It makes me remember my grandparents. I loved looking out their wavy glass windows to the blurry outside. Moving around with my camera, I could play with a variety of designs, colors, and distortion of the flowers outside.”

– Susan Hay, about her photo on p. 3. Sue devotes much of her spare time pursuing her passion and interest in photography, which has increased her awareness of how photography helps us “see God at eye level.” She also enjoys leading retreats and workshops for persons of all ages on photography as a spiritual practice.

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hometown man

“This was the first time I visited my mom’s hometown, a village in Haryana, India. I had carried my camera and wanted to witness and capture everything that my mom experienced when she was a child. The man in this image is relaxing after a long day of hard work, sitting near a well in a field where he does farming.”

– Savvy Gulia, about her photo on p. 3. Savvy, a freelance photographer living in New Delhi, India, decided to pursue her dream of being a photographer a few years back. Most of her images are about people, capturing life in their seemingly negligible moments. Her pictures provide an opportunity to absorb a gesture, a smile, or a frown through her vision. Savvy’s forte is travel photography, but when not traveling, she enjoys capturing portraits, too. Read more about her at savvygulia.wordpress.com.

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sign

“This photograph was taken while doing a photography walk in my neighborhood in Houston, TX, collecting homework on color and composition for my photography class. I stumbled upon this sign resting in the contrast of life and discarded things that were out of place and began to ponder all of these things in my heart.”

– Lancia Rouse, about her photo on p. 3. Lanecia is an artist who has served in ministry with the United Methodist Church since 2002 in various roles—as a solo and youth pastor, an artist-in-residence, and project manager of The Art Project, Houston. She currently resides in Houston, Texas, where she continues her ministry as a writer, artist, photographer, speaker, and workshop leader. larartphotography.com.

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place to be

“I came upon the folks as I walked through a public park. They remind me of how much I take for granted.”

– Mark Allan Peterson, about his photo on pp. 8-9. Mark’s forty-five years of peering through a camera eyepiece have led him to the conclusion that surprise and beauty are much closer to all of us than we might think. His many thousands of film and digital images are the product of assignments to shoot music album covers, school groups, home building, public events, outdoor art, travel, hospitals, medical instruments, churches, weddings, political rallies, and sports. Ever curious, Mark’s artistic motto is: “We overlook the commonplace at our peril.”

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hidden house

“I was in New York City some years ago to do an environmental program, and was being guided around to various photo locations. We stopped at a gas station off one of the main thoroughfares and a nice fellow in rough clothing struck up a conversation. We somehow got onto living conditions in the city and he asked if I’d like to see how some folks live. He led me to his ‘house’, in a patch of trees behind a fence along the main road. This was one of several ‘homes’ in that small patch of trees and brush. People driving by would have no idea anyone was living there along the roadways in these scavenged materials.”

– Carl Hellman II, about his photo on p. 12. Carl is a professional photographer who has been inspired by the spiritual beauty and wonder of the Adirondack mountains and lakes. He has photographed for several regional books on the Adirondacks, New York state, and the coast of Maine. He has written books on comprehensive photo techniques, including a landscape photography field guide, and leads photo tours and workshops across the United States. His photography and information on his workshops can be found at carlheilman.com and on Facebook.

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isolation

“This photo is part of a series I did about isolation on my blog. I decided to photograph all the scenes at night to portray the individual as essentially hiding from everyone — perhaps, even himself. I think this is an important subject to address because I’ve heard so many dealing with the type of depression that originates from isolation.

Homelessness can physically isolate a person, which causes them to feel isolated and, in turn, isolate more. Sometimes people make a deliberate choice to separate from the world because of negative past experiences, closing themselves off from the risk of experiencing more hurt. It is a natural tendency to put walls in place to protect ourselves.

When God doesn’t answer our prayers the way we think God should, we might feel unheard or unwanted. The pain of that abandonment can also lead to isolation.”

– Eric Christopher Jackson, about his photo on pp. 18-19. Eric is a fine-art photographer and creative writer whose work is influenced by cinematography, interior design, and the Bible. It has been featured in Creative Fluff magazine. Eric’s poetry book was highlighted on the cover of Publisher’s Weekly Select (November 2013). Ultimately, he is interested in creating meaningful stories through the visual arts and writing.

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collage

The Open Door Community of Atlanta is a residential community in the Catholic Worker tradition (it is sometimes called a Protestant Catholic Worker House) that seeks to dismantle racism, sexism and heterosexism, abolish the death penalty, and proclaim the Beloved Community through loving relationships with some of the most neglected and outcast of God’s children: the homeless and our sisters and brothers who are in prison.

Located in Atlanta, Georgia, the community serves breakfasts and soup-kitchen lunches, provide showers and changes of clothes, staff a free medical clinic, conduct worship services and meetings for the clarification of thought, and provide a prison ministry, including monthly trips for families to visit loved ones at the Hardwick Prisons in central Georgia. It also advocates on behalf of the oppressed, homeless and prisoners through non-violent protests, grassroots organizing and the publication of its monthly newspaper, Hospitality.Learn why this important resource is closing its doors.

– Calvin Kimbrough took these portraits of members of The Open Door Community on pp. 24-25 during the time he worked with them.

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star

“This picture was taken during a children’s Christmas program at Union Chapel United Methodist Church in Albemarle, North Carolina. My wife, Leslee, was pastoring that church at the time and our two daughters were in the Christmas program. Naturally I had my camera and was photographing the children, but during the evening the star hanging from the ceiling rafters caught my attention.”

– Dan Wray, about his photo on p. 28. Dan recently retired from teaching religion, philosophy, and English at the college level. He serves as pastor of the Presbyterian church in Badin, North Carolina. Dan and his wife, Leslee, live on a farm in the Piedmont of North Carolina. They have three adult sons and two teen daughters. See some of Dan’s work at his website, danwrayphoto.com.

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portrait

The Open Door Community of Atlanta is a residential community in the Catholic Worker tradition (it is sometimes called a Protestant Catholic Worker House) that seeks to dismantle racism, sexism and heterosexism, abolish the death penalty, and proclaim the Beloved Community through loving relationships with some of the most neglected and outcast of God’s children: the homeless and our sisters and brothers who are in prison.

Located in Atlanta, Georgia, the community serves breakfasts and soup-kitchen lunches, provide showers and changes of clothes, staff a free medical clinic, conduct worship services and meetings for the clarification of thought, and provide a prison ministry, including monthly trips for families to visit loved ones at the Hardwick Prisons in central Georgia. It also advocates on behalf of the oppressed, homeless and prisoners through non-violent protests, grassroots organizing and the publication of its monthly newspaper, Hospitality. Learn why this important resource is closing its doors.

– Calvin Kimbrough took this portrait of Perry, a member of The Open Door Community on p. 30 during the time he worked with there.

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village

“The photo was taken in a poor area of Brazil. My Community has ministered there and I was part of a group to go there for our 40-year anniversary. I have hundreds of great photos and wonderful memories of the amazing people I met.”

– Marianne Stieg, OSF, about her photo on p. 38. Marianne is a member of the Franciscan Sisters of Joliet, Illinois. She is a spiritual director, retreat facilitator, teacher, and photographer. Marianne explains, “Photography and spirituality are my passion. I find the two to be complementary and nourishing to the spirit. A photograph exclusively captures a single moment, an image in time, a memory. It is my desire to bring life to images all around us. Spirituality feeds this vision.”

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winter

“This past winter we had one of our best snowfalls in Nashville. The flakes were large and fluffy. My favorite nearby park became serene and magical as I bundled up and walk the trail. Upon exiting the trail I was greeted with this image of solitude and grace.”

– Susan Hay, about her photo on p. 39. Susan devotes much of her spare time pursuing her passion and interest in photography, which has increased her awareness of how photography helps us “see God at eye level.” She also enjoys leading retreats and workshops for persons of all ages on photography as a spiritual practice.

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angel

“This image of a stained glass window in a church reminds me of this quote by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross,’People are like stained-glass windows. They sparkle and shine when the sun is out, but when the darkness sets in, their true beauty is revealed only if there is a light from within.'”

– Marie Nease, about her photo on p. 40. Marie is a six-time award-winning member of the Roswell Photographic Society. The love of photography spans multiple generations in her family. Marie has published articles and short stories and enjoys expressing herself through creative writing and poetry. Marie is a mother of four wonderful young men and grandmother to six. She lives near the mountains in Cornelia, Georgia. Visit her website, wingdreamer.com.

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nativity

“I enjoy the stained glass windows of historic churches. So many of these windows were designed with the purpose in mind of helping people engage the Biblical story in a visual way. The colors and detail in this particular window were rich and warm and inviting.”

– Susan Hay, about her photo on p. 42. Sue devotes much of her spare time pursuing her passion and interest in photography, which has increased her awareness of how photography helps us “see God at eye level.” She also enjoys leading retreats and workshops for persons of all ages on photography as a spiritual practice.

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manzanita

“This gorgeous Manzanita tree caught my attention as I was hiking in Marin County in Northern California one day. I love the way its branches reach up and tangle around creating interesting patches of blue sky “negative space.” The aesthetic beauty in nature never ceases to amaze me or bring me peace. Can’t wait to go visit again!”

– Nancy Terzian, about her photo on p. 47. Nancy is our art director and graphic designer. She has designed several book covers and interiors for Upper Room Books as well as other clients via her Nashville-based design studio, Buckinghorse Design. Before starting her own business ten years ago, Nancy was the art director and designer for several magazines in the San Francisco Bay area, including Yoga JournalElectronic Musician, and Frisko. To see some of Nancy’s other design work, visit facebook.com/BuckinghorseDesign or her website, nancyterzian.com.

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lanterns

“It was the lantern that drew me closer to the window, the simplicity of the design and the knowledge that later it would provide an essential light for all inside. By day a beautiful decoration, by night an essential source of projecting and increasing the light.”

– Susan Hay, about her photo on p. 42. Sue devotes much of her spare time pursuing her passion and interest in photography, which has increased her awareness of how photography helps us “see God at eye level.” She also enjoys leading retreats and workshops for persons of all ages on photography as a spiritual practice.

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